Thursday, June 10, 2010

How to Paint & Glaze Cabinets

I'm in the last stages of this Lipstick Kitchen rennovation.  I can't wait to show you more changes, but until then, how about a tutorial?

I have been getting many compliments on my cabinets since I repurposed them a few weeks ago.  So I thought I would share how I painted and glazed my honey oak kitchen cabinets. 

This is my first tutorial, if you will, so bear with me.  I'll try and keep my ADD in check.  I don't have pics of the paint process, but I do have pics of the glazing process.  And my nature is to tell you the 'quick and dirty', so if you're left hanging for more details, just leave a comment, and I will expound.

What you will need/What I used:

Cleaner: I used this dollar store Orange Cleaner/Degreaser.  409 works good, too.  Soap and water works.  If you're hardcore, you can use TSP. 

Sanding Sponges:
3M 100 grit for bare surfaces for initial roughing

Then 3M 220 grit for in-between coats


Deglosser:  Klean-Strip Easy Liquid Sander De-glosser


Paint: Valspar Homestead Resort Cream semi-gloss


Glaze: American Tradition (from Lowe's) Faux Antiquing Glaze--Asphaltum.  I went through 2 bottles.


Plastic gloves: I didn't use gloves.  Learn from me.


Drill: for taking the cabinets down and removing hardware.  Used for putting everything back together.  You could use a screwdriver, but then you would really want drink a Screwdriver 10 minutes into it.  Just sayin.

Sheets: To protect my rear from the garage floor.  Don't you love these that came with our camper?  And something to elevate doors off ground: These tubs are from the dollar store.  I had many on-hand from my spa consultant days.  Foot soak anyone?


2 good paint brushes: One brush for the painting of the inside edges, one brush for the glaze.  But if you have a lot of cabinets, I would think about investing in a paint sprayer if your space allows.  Our space didn't.

1 foam paint roller: for the surface area of the cabs.  4" or 6"

Lots of lint-free towels/rags: These are for the glaze removal.  I bought a bag from from Lowe's.  They are a t-shirt material.  I used one for cleaning, one for deglossing, and the LOTS for the glazing process. 

Tackcloth: for removing particles/dust after sanding

Fan: Helped the drying time for the paint. 

Plastic bowl: for the glaze


Radio: After a full weekend in the garage, you will know the playlist by heart.

Babysitter or Hubby: Hubby entertained the kiddos.  Couldn't have done this without him. 

Set of paint clothes:  I am the world's worst about just jumping into painting, without regard to my clothes or what I have on.  I always think, oh, I'll be careful!  Whatever.  Go throw on an old sorority shirt and some shorts and designate them as your paint clothes. 

PATIENCE: You will need it.  When you run low, step away from the cabinets.  Take sip of Screwdriver.  Breathe.  Sip.  Breathe.  Sip.  Ok, continue.

Gladiators Ready?  Contenders Ready?

Here we go.

Step 1:
We can have lots of fun! Oh wait, sorry--random NKOTB moment.
Remove doors and cabinet hardware

Step 2, 3, 4--Prep
Clean, sand, degloss door fronts and door backs.  Don't forget the cabinet bases.  And don't forget the drawer fronts. 


My cabinets are in 3 sections.  Due to space, I worked one section at a time.  Or you could tackle top cabs first, then work the bottom, or vice versa..whatever you wanna do.  Since I was working in sections, I didn't have to label my doors, because I knew where they belonged.  But if you are tackling all doors at once, then you might want to label them.

I cleaned all of them, then sanded all of them, then deglossed.  Like an assembly line. 

Have you figured out something that may be missing from the list?  Primer.  That's right.  I didn't prime.  gasp.  Call it taking a short-cut, taking a risk, whatever.  I didn't prime.  The deglosser label said priming wasn't needed.  You can prime if you want.  Or maybe use some paint/primer in one.  Nester doesn't always prime.  And Nester sometimes doesn't even take her cabinets down.  So just find what works for you.

Step 5: Time to paint.
I started with the backs of the doors first.  That way I would end up painting the door fronts last.  Make sense?

Use the brush for the inside crevices/inset edges. Then use the roller for the bigger surface area.

You do NOT have to paint the backs of your doors.  It took a lot of extra time to paint the inside of the doors, but to me, it gave it more of a custom look.  And PLUS, when it came to glazing, I mastered my technique on the back of the door, not the front of the door. 

Step 6:
After 1st coat dries, sand with the 220 grit sponge.  Use the tack cloth to remove particles.

Step 7:
Paint 2nd coat.

Step 8:
After 2nd coat dries, sand again with the 220.  Use the tack cloth to remove particles. 

(Sometimes I didn't sand in-between coats...Most of the time I forgot.  But I tried to remember because since I was going to be glazing, I wanted as much wood grain to come through as possible.  So don't freak out if you forgot.)

NOW...On to the glazing process!

Step 9:
Pour your glaze into a bowl. 

Step 10:
Use paint brush to apply glaze to door. 


Step 11:
Have panic attack.  Breathe.  Sip Screwdriver.

The bottle says there is a 15 minute window after you apply the glaze.  I tried to get the look I wanted within 5 minutes.  And make sure your fan isn't blowing during your glazing process as to not dry out the glaze sooner than later.

Stpe 12:
Dampen your lint free cloth, then start wiping the door.  If it's not wiping off as much as you would like, get the cloth a little more wet.  If you take off more than you wanted, apply more glaze, then wipe off till you get the look you want.


I wiped the outside edge first.



Then wiped the inside panel.


Then after a few more minutes of wiping, I get the look I want.

Once I got the look I wanted, I made sure the other doors matched up to each other....so one wasn't darker or lighter than the other. 

Some door insets were different than others...meaning the wood grain looked different from each other, or the wood took the glaze different.  See...Talk about frustrating.  But these doors are on either side of the stove, so it's not as noticable as in these pics.



It was frustrating, but remember it's NOT going to be perfect.  And that is the whole idea of glazing...to give it a weathered, antiqued look.  If you are OCD, you might want to invest in some chill pills before taking this project on :)

I know I've used the words 'panic attack' and 'frustrating'...but it really is an easy process.  Yes, it was hard physically--up and down, and moving around a lot.  But it is so worth the time and the money saved. 

Speaking of money saved....

I had a painter come and give a quote on painting the cabinets.  $1300.  Doubt it, mister.

1 gallon of paint = $30
2 things of glaze = $16
Beadboard Wallpaper = $25/roll.  (A fraction of the roll was used for the cabinet ends...I'll post more on that later.)

Most of the other supplies we had on-hand.  I haven't bought the new trim yet.  And I bought the hardware a couple of years ago. 

So right now, I'll just round up to $100. 

$100 vs. $1300 for a major impact.










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EDITED TO ADD:
I did put a coat of Poly on these! 

I would also like to say thank you to Michelle. When scouring google for how to paint kitchen cabinets, I came across her website that she made with detailed step-by-step instructions. It is really a great tutorial!

And thank you to Jenny at Anything Pretty. Her paint and glaze tutorials are awesome, too!

Edited to Add:
Click here to fast forward to full Lipstick Kitchen Reveal!

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Thanks for stopping by! 

I hope this encourages and gives confindence to someone to start that project you've been putting off!
You can do it!

Feel free to share your comments, and ask any questions! 


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Make it Yours @ My Backyard Eden













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36 comments:

  1. I love the look of your new kitchen! You are one brave woman to tackle that project! Really a great transformation!

    Jeanine

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  2. WOW! It's amazing what a little paint will do huh? I Love it! Thanks for your comment- they always make my day! :)

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  3. What a huge improvement! Nice job!

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  4. Judith... they look great! What a project!! You are brave... very brave! I am thinking about painting mine...maybe?! :) Great tutorial... thanks for sharing!

    Kendra @ Creative Ambitions

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  5. I Love it!! I really like that style of painted cabinets!! It's so awesome to be able to do it yourself rather than pay big bucks to have them ALL replaced!! Looks great!! Thanks for sharing!!

    http://coutureunraveled.blogspot.com/

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  6. Nice! You must adore your lighter room! I sure love the hardware you chose for it too.

    Donna

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  7. Gorgeous! I love the new look. I am dying to paint our cabinets, but I dont know when I will get to it. Thanks for sharing!

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  8. The final look is very stunning, I am sure you smile every time you enter the room. This is the second time I've seen the sander deglazer (sp?) need to find it!1
    Thanks for the tutorial,
    Kathy

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  9. you did great! I'm so glad I made my way over from Tatertots and Jello!

    I can't believe how much better your kitchen looks...amazing!

    Now a happy follower!

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  10. ABSOLUTELY LOVELY! And I love that there are variations...it should look custom, not mass produced...you did a GREAT job! I'll feature this in my Saturday Shout Out later today (or sometimes tomorrow:)...come check it out! -shaunna :)

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  11. looks great! I want to glaze my cupboards, but since they are brand new (we haven't lived here long) my hubby doesn't think its the best idea. Oh well. Thanks for stopping by my blog!

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  12. Love the cabinets - I've been trying to talk myself into getting brave enough to do it to my kitchen....would love to have new cabinets....just not in the price range! =0) I'd like to invite you to come plant your creative seeds at my blog party on Fridays - its still open until Sunday if you want to come plant!

    Kristi
    Punkin Seed Productions

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  13. What an amazing transformation. I'm thinking of redoing my cabinets in the near future and can't decide what to do with them. This was inspiring!

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  14. WONDERFUL job. I just went through that whole process myself. I can appreciate how much work it is. It's a terrific update for your kitchen.
    Lisa

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  15. You did a fantastic job on this...love how it turned out! My cabinets are lovely honey oak as well and I SOOOO want to do this...thanks for sharing the tutorial!!!


    LaKeta

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  16. What a great transformation. I love it. It is nice to see that you can "remodel" on a budget.

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  17. What a great transformation. I love it. It is nice to see that you can "remodel" on a budget.

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  18. Oh man! I have SO MUCH honey oak. I hate it, hate it hate! This is such a great idea! I have been hesitant to paint because I thought it would be too much for our style, but this maintains the wood look in an more modern way. I really really appreciate your including the steps too. I am afraid to do anything without step by step instructions in front of me.

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  19. What a nice transformation. I hope to be doing my kitchen cabinet this summer for the 4th time. I know first hac how much work that was. Great job!

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  20. What a great job you did! These look fantastic! Your kitchen looks so bright and open now!

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  21. Repainting and renovating some furniture are two of the few ways we do in building maintenance around the house. I would suggest cleaners that have citrus in the formula. I've been using lemon cleaner in our house in NYC -- they work all the time.

    The transformation is lovely! It gave a brighter look for the entire kitchen. I'll ask my husband if we can try this one. Thanks, Judith!

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  22. These look great! You did a really nice job!

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  23. It looks great but how long did all that take you to do?

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  24. Phew, this is going to be my Memorial Day project, so reading your post made me feel much, much better about tackling it. (Luckily, my kitchen is itty-bitty.) I still think I'll need a few screwdrivers though.

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  25. Your blog helped me so much, I just love it!!! Thanks

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  26. Hi there!!!!!!!
    They look great!!!!!! So glad my site was of help!
    Michelle

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  27. I am so grateful for the instructions, my daughter will be doing this same thing this week . Y ou did an amazing job.

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  28. Beauty guide How to Paint & Glaze Cabinets from Judith. Step by step and easy to implementation for cabinet.
    Thanks Judith and make your kithcen beautiful.

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  29. Another hint when you are painting the doors,use push pins in the corners of the back of the doors. After painting the backs put yours push pins in then flip it over and rest the doors on the pins, so you can do the front of the doors at the same time. This way if there were any drips you will see them right away and it cuts the time in half. You will never see the tiny pin holes in the back of the door. Or you can purchase the little plastic pyramids that they sell at Home Depot or Lowes.

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  30. Your kitchen looks great, good job. I think I'm going to use this technique to refinish a cherry buffet and hutch we found through Craigslist to match our existing dining room table. Thanks for the tips!

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  31. this was so amazing!! Thank you thank you. I am so excited to get started on our new house, we are closing this week!

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  32. I would love to lighten my oak cabinets..would need paint process which is not included here. Did you post that somewhere else?
    Thanks

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  33. I've been searching for a good glazing technique, and I must say your's toped almost all the ones I've found so far, a lot of the ones I found on the internet look streaky and not very good, but I think your technique is spot on, it's exactly what I've been looking for...thank you so much for sharing!

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